What Place Does Colocation Have in a Cloud Based World?

For many companies, having their own servers has become a thing of the past. Where once, a business had to find space to place racks, run wiringprovide backup power, etc., they can now utilize someone else’s servers halfway across the world. 

Even for companies who need high-performance, extra security, and 24/monitoring, cloud hosting solutions can provide dedicated server space that keeps up with all of their demands. 

But in-between cloud servers and in-house servers, there is another option: colocation. 

Colocation is when you house your own physical server equipment in a third-party data center. You handle the purchasing and configuration of the equipment. The data center keeps it secure, powered, and cooled.  

This has proven to be a popular solution, as it frees businesses from having to store their dedicated servers in their own buildings. Advanced systems can make noise and run hot, not to mention they need backup power sourcesextra security measures, and high-speed network access. 

By placing your equipment in a data center, you can free up your own real estate and remove the responsibility of keeping your servers powered, protected, and connected. It’s a best of both worlds approach. 

However, as cloud hosting and dedicated virtual servers have grown in capabilities, many have moved away from colocation. Some have even gone as far as to say that colocation is dead. This is not true. In fact, colocation is on the rise. 

Why is that? It’s simple. Some businesses need their own equipment.  

And others just like having ownership over it. 

There are a few reasons why you may want colocation.

Specific Hardware Requirements 

Every business has different hardware, compliance, and security measures to follow. Cloud servers take a universal approach to hosting, providing more of a “one-size-fits all” solution, even if there are some options you can customize. 

With colocation, you choose every part of your setup, which means you can tailor it to your specific needs. In some cases, a company’s software and/or internal systems may require server hardware that simply isn’t popular enough to be found as an option for cloud hosting. 

Technical Knowhow 

Due to the fact that you’re purchasing and configuring your own equipment, colocation does require some advanced IT knowhow. For companies with IT workers on staff, this is great, as it allows them to setup their system exactly how they want it.  

And we know firsthand how particular IT people can be about the way things are configured. 

Ownership 

Cloud hosting, even when you’re using private or dedicate servers, is a rental service. You are paying someone to use their equipment. When you stop paying them, you lose the ability to use that equipment. They may also have specific rules regarding how you use the equipment. Some businesses are completely fine with that. 

Others prefer ownership. 

With colocation, the equipment is yours to use as you wish. If you decide to change who you’re partnering with for hosting, you can take your equipment with you. 

In Need of Colocation? 

Our Data Center in Dayton, Ohio is equipped to handle all of your server needs. Whether you want private cloud hosting, shared hosting, or space for colocation, you can expect a high quality, customer driven experience. 

Our colocation services are scalable and move-in ready. At DataYard, you’ll have 24/7/365 access, should you need it. Meanwhile, we’ll make sure your equipment stays secured, protected, and connected.  

Our Data Center is Here for You

LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR COLOCATION SERVICES


DataYard’s 2016 Internship Program – Internet of Things Kick-Off!

On June 1st DataYard officially brought on two new summer interns for a specific and pretty cool project – to explore the Internet of Things (IoT)!

The chosen ones – Owen Devine and James Kinion – will be working with us through August to design, build, and deploy mobile units which report not only their own geographic location, but a slew of environmental variables as well. While we have a vague idea of how we at DataYard might accomplish this task, the interns have been set free in a sea of low-cost devices which when used together can accomplish almost anything.

We’re makers here at DataYard, and are super excited about the future of the IoT space. We got a 3D Printer for the office last Christmas, and Eric Wright has probably burned through twenty pounds of PLA over seventeen generations of a custom-fit phone Heads Up Display for his road bike. We built our own big-screen network status and reporting display, have daily DJ battles on a Raspberry Pi3 via Airplay to the MusicBox interface, and a Retrobox Pi3 for SNES emulation is coming soon – not even mentioning the custom solutions we put in place for clients every day.

We’re hoping to support the future of the IoT movement by getting some sharp young minds playing the field – and we plan to do that while deploying additional (and mobile) environmental monitoring to our data center – stay tuned for updates on DataYard’s continuing quest to innovate and create ways to Make IT Better!

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

The technological landscape continues to evolve at a fantastic pace, and staying on top of it all can be challenging. In spite of the high rate of change I think there are some “timeless” lessons we’ve learned over the last two decades, lessons that will continue to be true for the foreseeable future. Here are three lessons that are part of our DNA today and are integrated in our daily thinking.

The first is that the demand for robust, high-performance Internet access and applications consistently increases. It never shrinks. Our clients today are getting much more comfortable taking their applications off-site and into the cloud, so reliable, fast, low-latency connections to the network are becoming increasingly vital to daily operations. Furthermore, our users are connecting to their data using a dizzying array of devices, applications, and APIs from a diverse number of geographic locations. This trend is only going to continue as more computing power is loaded into smartphones and tablets, and small-footprint IoT (Internet of Things) devices like Arduinos and Raspberry Pis multiply.

The second is that good data and application security cannot be an after-thought. Protecting data, and your users’ access to it, has to be an important element of the system from Day 1. Good security is not something you do once and then assume you’re done, nor is it something you bolt onto an already-built system. Good security requires processes that are enforced, systems and software that are monitored around the clock, and software updates and security patches — at least at the operating system level — for the lifespan of the application. Failing to take security seriously from the onset means that your critical systems might be exposed to potential compromise, and that critical business data might be corrupted or lost.

Thirdly, a tremendous amount of planning and care is needed to integrate new Internet services into a client’s enterprise with nearly zero downtime to the end user. This cannot be done haphazardly. It requires knowledge of a client’s working environments, their online habits, their schedules, their processes. It requires critical thinking and the judgment skills necessary to weigh competing priorities to help create installation plans that minimize negative ripple effects when new systems are brought online. It requires the ability to communicate excellently, both on a technical and an operational level. A client can’t have a positive technology experience if they don’t understand what’s going on, if they don’t know who is leading the project, or if they never know where they are in the process.

For the last few years I’ve used a line from a superhero movie to describe the importance of the role we at DataYard play on behalf of our clients: “With great power comes great responsibility.” We take the management of our entire infrastructure, and the management of individual client applications from end-to-end, very seriously. When you have the power to bring an enterprise’s technology to a screeching halt you tend to open technical doors very carefully. You only open those doors when you absolutely have to. You do it with a purpose, and you know — in advance — exactly what you’re going to do when you’re on the other side. To be careless with a client’s applications or data only invites disaster.

Nobody likes disasters, including technological disasters. Responsible technologists avoid disasters by first imagining all the things that could go wrong. Then they use their position and influence to mitigate those risks one by one through good processes, building in capacity and redundancy, and preparation prior to plan execution. To do anything less is a disservice to your users.

Open House — Under the Hood at DataYard

Open House at DataYard

On November 9, 2012, we hosted an Open House at our new facility. We called it our “Under the Hood” tour, and gave our visitors a chance to see what makes our new facility, particularly our new Data Center, tick.

Below are some select photos from the event.

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